UW center near Lingle hosts sugarbeet micronutrient, moisture sensor workshop

Extension irrigation specialist Vivek Sharma. who is based at the Powell Research and Extension Center.

What micronutrients are needed and when by sugarbeets to get maximum yields and soil moisture sensor field demonstrations are topics of a mini-field day 10 a.m.-noon Wednesday, Sept. 6, at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center near Lingle.

University of Wyoming Extension irrigation specialist Vivek Sharma will discuss micronutrient applications to sugarbeets.

Research has shown micronutrients can help grow bigger roots, increase leaf area and cause earlier canopy closure with an increased sugar percentage and tonnage per acre, said Caleb Carter, UW Extension educator. The project is in collaboration with Agriscience Technologies.

For the soil moisture sensor project, Sharma has installed several different types and will discuss the differences in their operation, maintenance and data interpretation.

There is no cost for the workshop but RSVPs for lunch would be appreciated, said Carter. Call him at 307-532-2436 to RSVP or with any questions.

Cheatgrass, crop trial data among field day topics at research center near Lingle

Brian Connely (center), weed and pest district supervisor from Natrona County, discusses his team's approach to managing cheatgrass in the Cheatgrass Challenge during last year's field day.
Brian Connely (center), weed and pest district supervisor from Natrona County, discusses his team’s approach to managing cheatgrass in the Cheatgrass Challenge during last year’s field day.

Cheatgrass renovation efforts, Roundup Ready alfalfa and recognition of the Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station’s 125 years in Wyoming are among field day topics Thursday, Aug. 25, at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center (SAREC) near Lingle.

Registration begins at 4 p.m., and research presentations are 4:20-5:30 p.m. Recognition of the Agricultural Experiment Station’s 125th anniversary is 5:30-6 p.m., followed by dinner.

Pistol and Pete, AES’s draft horse team, are scheduled to be present, pulling the college’s restored sheep wagon. SAREC is one of four research and extension centers under the direction of AES. The others are near Powell, Sheridan and Laramie.

David Kruger, agricultural liaison librarian with University of Wyoming Libraries, will provide perspective on AES’ history in Wyoming. AES was started one year after the last soldiers left the decommissioned Fort Laramie and one year after Wyoming was admitted to the union.

Additional field day topics include bluetongue disease research, quinoa, wheat variety trial results, wheat weather monitoring, beneficial insects for alfalfa and birdsfoot trefoil. Information about these and other continuing research at all research and extension centers is available at bit.ly/2016bulletin.

RSVPs for dinner are requested by Wednesday, Aug. 17. Contact Kelly Greenwald at 307-837-2000 or at kgreenwa@uwyo.edu.

The field day is in conjunction with the Goshen County Chamber of Commerce After Hours.

Farm manager joins UW Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center

Kevin Madden
Kevin Madden

Kevin Madden began April 30 as farm manager at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center (SAREC) near Lingle. 

Madden brings experience as an owner, operator and manager of a family production farm and ranch in Potter, Nebraska, said SAREC director John Tanaka.  

Madden will manage irrigated and dryland crops, rangelands, and livestock at SAREC. He will also help coordinate off-site research and extension activities on the center.

“He is a good fit,” Tanaka said. 

SAREC is now growing corn, sugar beets, wheat, dry beans, alfalfa, millet and barley, as well as pollinator flowers, cool season grasses, quinoa, fenugreek and cover crops.

A small cow-calf herd and feed cattle are maintained at SAREC for livestock research, including blue tongue disease in cattle and several feed efficiency trials.

“In Nebraska, Madden produced similar crops on dryland and center pivot irrigated acres similar in size to SAREC,” said Tanaka.  “He raised livestock as a commercial cow calf producer, small feeder, and breeder of American Quarter Horses for ranch work and pleasure,” he said.

Madden earned a diploma in center pivot sprinkler irrigation service/installation from Western Nebraska Technical College in Sidney and holds a Nebraska special electrician irrigation equipment license. He has also worked as a federal crop insurance adjuster. 

Madden’s involvement with youth programs includes 4-H, Odyssey of the Mind and Destination Imagination programs to promote creative and critical thinking, and the Cheyenne County, Neb., fair and rodeo royalty program. 

For more information, contact Madden at 307-837-2000 or kmadden1@uwyo.edu

UW professor honored for making rangeland science available to all

John Tanaka
John Tanaka

The United States Agricultural Information Network (USAIN) in April will present honorary membership to John Tanaka of the University of Wyoming in recognition for making rangeland science more widely accessible, collecting local knowledge and strengthening knowledge networks.

Tanaka is a professor and associate director of the Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station, which oversees all research in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and director of the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center (SAREC) near Lingle.

Tanaka and Karen Launchbaugh, professor and director of the Rangeland Center at the University of Idaho, developed Range Science Information System (RSIS), an online bibliographic database of more than 1,400 journal articles and other documents about range management in the United States.

The RSIS provides summaries of articles and provides links to most.

“The RSIS bridges the digital divide between the scientific community and land managers and owners,” said Sarah Williams of USAIN. 

The term rangeland encompasses many open-space habitats grazed by domestic animals and wildlife. RSIS links to articles on rangelands such as Rocky Mountain grasslands, Alaska highlands, Nebraska Sandhills, Kentucky bluegrass and Gulf Coast prairies and marshes.

 Tanaka is also leading Discovering our Nation’s Rangelands, a project to collect oral histories and local knowledge from ranchers and land managers. The project is funded by a grant from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Continue reading UW professor honored for making rangeland science available to all

Plant scientist joins James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center

Carrie Eberle examines volunteer spring canola in late October as part of her studies in Minnesota. The canola was allowed to regrow from the first crop to provide a late-season floral resource for pollinators.
Carrie Eberle examines volunteer spring canola in late October as part of her studies in Minnesota. The canola was allowed to regrow from the first crop to provide a late-season floral resource for pollinators.

A scientist specializing in agronomy and cropping systems is joining the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center (SAREC) near Lingle.

Carrie Eberle began Monday, Feb. 1.
SAREC is part of the Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station housed in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Wyoming.

Eberle has been studying alternative crops during her postdoctoral work in Minnesota.
“A big focus has been on how we can use agriculture to better provide ecosystem services like reducing soil erosion and providing benefits to pollinator health while still maintaining strong economic value to the farmer,” said Eberle, who received her B.S. in biology and horticulture from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her Ph.D. in plant sciences from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities.

Eberle is an assistant professor in the Department of Plant Sciences in the college.

She said she believes much of her work in Minnesota looking at soil and water quality and agroecosystems is directly applicable in Wyoming.

“I am excited to work with the growers to start to exploring alternative cropping systems that are going to provide economic opportunity and be more sustainable for the area,” she said.