Powell panel nutrition discussion this June

Information about diabetes, gluten-free foods, planning nutritional menus and what children eat in Park County School District No. 1 are topics for a nutrition panel sponsored by University of Wyoming Extension.

The panel is 11:30 a.m.-12:50 p.m. Thursday, June 6, at the Homesteader Museum in Powell.

“You are welcome to bring your lunch and enjoy it while listening,” said Sandra Frost, extension educator.

Those leading discussions include: Katy Asay, a registered dietician and certified diabetes educator from Powell Valley Healthcare, who will discuss nutrition and diabetes; Jill Smith, owner of Gluten Free Oats, who will discuss nutrition and allergies; Phyllis Lewis, extension nutrition and food safety educator, who will describe how to design nutritious meals; and Deb Eckhardt, food service director at Park County School District No. 1, who will discuss the latest in school food policy and selection.

The event is part of programming that revolves around a Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibit called Key Ingredients: America by Food, which will be on display at the Homesteader Museum Aug. 24 through Oct. 25.

“The exhibit examines food in American life and its relationship with our history and culture,” said Frost.

To find out more about Key Ingredients events and programming, visit www.homesteadermuseum.com.

For more information, contact Frost at 307-754-8836 or sfrost1@uwyo.edu.

Creative New York City gardener offers take-home messages for Big Horn Basin green thumbs

    UW Extension will sponsor a free showing of “Truck Farm,” an award-winning comedy film directed by Ian Cheney, 6:30 p.m. Thursday, March 28, at the Powell Library.

The film depicts the roots of the Truck Farm mobile garden education project, which began when Cheney planted a garden in the bed of a 1986 Dodge truck in Brooklyn, N.Y.

“New Yorkers must be creative when it comes to growing their own food in the city,” said Sandra Frost, UW Extension educator. “Wyomingites can take home messages from the film and apply them to growing food in our own unique environment.”

Nutritionist Marion Nestle, chef Dan Barber and rooftop farmer Ben Flanner are featured in the film.

“The film tells the story of quirky urban farmers,” said Frost. “Ian takes an old truck, gives it a new, green life, and takes us on a tour of urban farms in New York City while blending humor and philosophy.”

The event is part of extension programming that revolves around a Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibit called “Key Ingredients: America by Food,” which will be on display at theHomesteader Museum from Aug. 24-Oct. 25 in Powell; the exhibit examines food in American life and its relationship with our history and culture, said Frost. Visit www.homesteadermuseum.com for information about the “Key Ingredients: America by Food” exhibit.

For more information, contact Frost at 307-754-8836 or email her at sfrost@uwyo.edu.

New EPA farm fuel-tank regulations start May 10

Sandra Frost
Sandra Frost

Those who store fuel, oil, crop oil, hydraulic oil, surfactant, adjuvant and other materials on farms or ranches must comply with EPA-mandated Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) plans by May 10.

The EPA’s new SPCC rule includes requirements for oil spill prevention, preparedness and response to prevent oil discharges to navigable waters and adjoining shorelines.

“The SPCC regulations apply to any farm if an oil spill from your farm could reasonably be expected to reach water,” said Sandra Frost, UW Extension educator. “Many farmers and ranchers will find it simple to comply with EPA regulations while others, with larger tanks on one parcel of land, will have to hire a certified engineer and build berms or dikes.”

Those who store more than 1,320 gallons in aboveground tanks (55 gallons or more each), or 42,000 gallons in buried tanks on one parcel of land, are subject to SPCC regulations.

“Do not add together the storage capacity on different parcels you own or lease,” said Frost. “A farm may have a plan for each parcel where storage exceeds 1,320 gallons.”

Continue reading New EPA farm fuel-tank regulations start May 10

Park County extension offers Master Gardener training

Master Gardener training with hands-on instruction from University of Wyoming Extension horticultural experts starts March 5 in Cody.

“This is an excellent opportunity for people who love gardening to learn more about horticulture, network with local gardeners and serve their communities,” said Sandra Frost, extension educator.

Training sessions are 9 a.m.-noon Tuesdays and Thursdays, March 5-April 30, in the basement of the Park County Courthouse in Cody.

The fee is $125 for those intending to become Master Gardeners and $225 for those not intending to become Master Gardeners. Trainees will receive a “UW Sustainable Horticulture Handbook,” one soil test and classroom materials.

 

“The course will be 48 hours of gardening classes on a variety of topics, including soils, insects, plant diseases, integrated pest management, vegetable and flower gardening, lawns, pruning and more,” said Frost. “The class is open to the general public as well as to those wishing to become Master Gardeners.”

Applications are available at the Powell extension office or at the Cody office in the basement of the Park County Courthouse.

For more information and to register, call Frost at 307-754-8836 or 307-527-8836 or email her at sfrost1@uwyo.edu.

Cody workshop centers on weathering drought

Weathering drought is the theme of the Living on a Few Acres 2013 workshop Saturday, Feb. 23, at the Holiday Inn in Cody.

Registration opens at 8:30 a.m., and programs begin at 9 a.m; registration is $15 per person and includes lunch.

·      9 a.m. topics are pruning trees, alternative energy solutions and irrigation districts in Park County

·      10 a.m. topics are permaculture, how to build a road and native plants for drought

·      11 a.m. topics are growing grapes, menus from the garden and native plants for drought

·      Noon keynote luncheon speaker Loren Smith, superintendent Water Division III, State Engineer’s Office, will discuss surface waters of northwest Wyoming

·      1:30 p.m. topics are growing grapes, trees for Park County and pasture management for drought

·      The final sessions at 2:30 p.m. cover native pollinators, firewise landscaping and pasture management for drought

The workshop is presented by the Cody Conservation District, Meeteetse Conservation District, Powell-Clarks Fork Conservation District, Park County Weed and Pest Control District, Master Gardeners and University of Wyoming Extension.

To register or for more information, contact extension educator Sandra Frost in Powell at 307-754-8836 or sfrost1@uwyo.edu.