University of Wyoming Extension News

Mining, reclamation association meeting first in Wyoming since 2007

Pete Stahl

Pete Stahl

Mining and reclamation industry representatives will converge on Laramie for a joint conference at which organizers say they hope to boost knowledge and share information industry-wide.

Registrations are at 320 and increasing for the meeting of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation (ASMR) and the Wyoming Reclamation and Restoration Center (WRRC) June 1-7 at the Hilton Garden Inn.

“It is one of the largest professional reclamation conferences in the world, and it’s indicative of the important role Wyoming plays in the field of land reclamation and ecosystem restoration in the United States,” said Pete Stahl, director of the WRRC in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Wyoming.

In 2007, Gillette hosted the most-recent ASMR meeting in Wyoming.

UW reclamation and soils specialists are helping organize and shepherd more than 80 presentations and various tours during the conference.

Continue reading

New publication examines reclamation considerations on oil, gas lease contracts

What reclamation issues landowners entering lease agreements with energy exploration and production companies should be aware of are described in a new bulletin from the Wyoming Reclamation and Restoration Center (WRRC) at the University of Wyoming.

“Reclamation considerations for oil and gas lease contracts on private lands, ” B-1242, describes what should be discussed by landowners and contactors before a lease agreement is signed. A reclamationplan should be agreed upon prior to the construction phase of oil or natural gas wells, according to the publication authors Jay Norton and Calvin Strom.

Norton is a professor in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and is the UW Extension soils specialist, and Calvin Strom is a researcher in the WRRC.

The publication is available for free download by going to http://www.uwyo.edu/ces, clicking on Publications on the left-hand side then Search Bulletins. Type the publication number in the search field.

Powell reclamation, restoration workshop emphasizes hands-on learning

Wyoming Reclamation and Restoration Center assistant director and research scientist Calvin Strom

Participants at a two-day workshop in Powell will get interactive, hands-on experiences in designing a reclamation plan with exercises planned in the field and classroom.

Hosted by the Wyoming Reclamation and Restoration Center (WRRC) at the University of Wyoming, the workshop is Wednesday and Thursday, May 30-31, at the Powell Research and Extension Center.

“Our Barriers to Reclamation Survey conducted last fall demonstrated participants wanted more in-depth and hands-on experiences at our workshops,” said Calvin Strom, research scientist in the WRRC.  “This workshop features a new format with field experience developing a reclamation plan for a specific site and classroom exercises with a question-and-answer period.”

Field exercises Wednesday focus on mapping suitable soils for salvage, inventorying vegetation on the site and addressing all components of a reclamation plan.

During Thursday’s session, participants will produce an overall reclamation plan based on data and observations obtained Wednesday.  Overall reclamation plans will include wildlife habitat and erosion/water quality considerations.

Information about the workshop is at www.uwyo.edu/wrrc. Click on Workshops on the left-hand side of the page. To RSVP, call the WRRC by Wednesday, May 23, at 307-766-3576.  Lunch will be provided Wednesday only. For more information, contact Strom at the same number or at cstrom@uwyo.edu.

UW Extension bulletin shows how to reclaim salt or sodium soils

Taking soil samples

How to reclaim salt- and sodium-affected soils is described in a new publication from the University of Wyoming Extension.

The publication, B-1231, is part of a series by extension and the Wyoming Reclamation and Restoration Center (WRRC) at the University of Wyoming describing how to successfully restore severely disturbed lands.

The bulletin describes saline and sodic soils, identifies how to prevent salt problems during reclamation and describes remediation with organic and chemical amendments.

“Reclaiming severely disturbed soils with elevated levels of salt, sodium or both is difficult,” state authors Jay Norton, extension soils specialist, and Calvin Strom, a research associate in the WRRC. “Undisturbed topsoil is often less than 3 inches thick, but soil salvage operations usually scrape soils to a standard 6-inch depth. This mixes surface soil material with material from deeper in the soil profile that may contain higher salt and/or sodium levels or other toxic materials that inhibit plant growth.”

The publication is available online. Go to http://www.uwyo.edu/ces/ and click on Publications on the left-hand side.  Click search bulletins and type B-1231 in the Publication Number field.