New extension bulletin explains why price slide important marketing factor

            Why price slides at livestock markets and in forward price contracts are important when making production and marketing decisions is explained in a new publication from the University of Wyoming Extension.

Price slide is the naturally occurring phenomenon that cattle prices tend to decrease as an animal’s weight increases.

What is the Price Slide?, B-1319, is available for viewing or free download by going to www.uwyo.edu/uwe and clicking on Find a Publication. Enter the title or number.

If making operational changes to increase weaning weights – for example, buying more expensive bulls or shifting calving dates – understanding how that decision affects calf values, not just weights, can be important, stated the authors. Understanding how price slide affects forward contracts can help producers decide whether or not to deliver calves that are under or over the agreed-upon weight.

Bulletin authors are UW Extension agricultural systems specialist John Ritten, extension livestock marketing specialist Bridger Feuz, beef cattle specialist Steve Paisley and extension educator Hudson Hill. For more information, contact Ritten at 307-766-3373 or john.ritten@uwyo.edu, or Feuz at 307-783-0570 or bmfeuz@uwyo.edu.

What is the Price Slide?” is among many free guides, courses and videos from UW Extension to help extend skills in ranching, irrigation, small acreage management, succession, legacy and estate planning and more. YouTube video series from UW Extension include “Barnyards and Backyards,” “From the Ground Up” and “Exploring the Nature of Wyoming.”

Agricultural emergency response training meeting in Torrington

A meeting to train for and improve planning for agricultural emergencies in the Goshen County area is Thursday, March 29, in Torrington.

The free training is 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Goshen County 4-H Building at 7078 Fairgrounds Road. The program is a collaborative effort between the Goshen County emergency manager and University of Wyoming Extension, said Scott Cotton, extension educator and delegate to the Extension Disaster Education Network.

He said the training is focused toward agricultural producers, law enforcement, firefighters, public health officials, county commissioners, veterinarians and others related to agriculture or emergency management.

The meeting addresses blizzards, floods, wildfires, disease outbreaks, truck accidents and other incidents.

The program includes:

* Disaster issues for individual areas/counties.

* Livestock transportation response.

* Information from the emergency manager.

* Animal identification and diseases related to disasters.

* FEMA training on disease outbreaks at fairs and exhibitions.

The program is one of several this spring across Wyoming. The Wyoming Stock Growers Association and Wyoming Wool Growers Association are among groups supporting the meetings that look at agriculture in individual counties to develop better emergency mitigation efforts, said Cotton.

The seminar includes FEMA certified exercises for emergency responders and peace officer credit hours. Registration is requested by noon March 28. Go to https://www.eventbrite.com and type in Torrington, Wyoming, in the “City or location” search field to find the event.

Contact Cotton at 307-235-9400 or secotton@natronacounty-wy.gov for more information.

Exercise nutrition, fetal development earn Agricultural Experiment Station research awards

A University of Wyoming professor who is advancing understanding of nutrition’s role in the performance of casual exercisers to elite athletes and an assistant professor who seeks to improve meat quality by investigating prenatal influences in livestock have received research awards from the Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station (WAES).

“I am always impressed by the quality of nominations we receive for these awards. I also find it interesting that this year’s winners utilize livestock species to study human health, and in both cases, their research has implications for both livestock and humans,” said Bret Hess, associate dean of research in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and WAES director. He and dean Frank Galey presented the awards in December in Laramie.

Woman holds giant fake bill as award, flanked by presenters
Bret Hess, associate dean of research in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and WAES director; Enette Larson-Meyer, professor in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, and dean Frank Galey

Enette Larson-Meyer of the Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics in the Department of Family and Consumer Science earned the Outstanding Research Award for her investigations on how diet and exercise influence skeletal muscle metabolism, energy balance and the prevention of obesity. Her research has explored how nutrition influences the health and performance of active individuals at all stages of life and levels of performance.

She has also explored the influence of vitamin D on health and human performance and increasing the nutritional value of pork and other animal foods through sun exposure.

Larson-Meyer served on the 2011 International Olympic Committee Sports Nutrition Consensus Panel and is active in the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the American College of Sports Medicine. She is author of the book “Vegetarian Sports Nutrition: Food Choices and Eating Plans for Fitness and Performance.” She joined the University of Wyoming in 2005.

Wei Guo in the Department of Molecular Biology received the Early Career Research Award. A major research focus of the Guo laboratory is fetal programming or how physiological characteristics of the developing fetus can be influenced by environmental events with lasting effects. Guo is studying the life course impact of fetal programming on striated (skeletal) muscle development and function.

Man holds giant fake bill as award, flanked by presenters
Frank Galey, dean of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources; Wei Guo, assistant professor in the Department of Molecular Biology, and Bret Hess, associate dean of research and Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station director.

His long-term goals are to develop therapeutic strategies for striated muscle diseases and improve meat quality and quantity in livestock. His program has attracted more than a $1 million from funding organizations such as the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Agriculture and the American Heart Association. Guo joined the University of Wyoming in 2013.

For more information, contact Hess at 307-766-3667 or brethess@uwyo.edu.

New guide provides tools for ranchers, others in sage-grouse country

Nine brown birds in green field, red hillside in back.
Young sage-grouse congregate along an irrigation ditch in a freshly cut hay field. Photo: Leanne Correll

According to its authors, Landowner Guide to Sage-grouse Conservation in Wyoming: A Practical Guide for Land Owners and Managers is meant to enhance understanding and conservation of sage-grouse in Wyoming.

The new guide, which provides tools and resources, is available as a free download from University of Wyoming Extension at bit.ly/UWEpubs.

“It condenses scientific findings into a practical format that is easy to use and understand,” said Derek Scasta, a UW Extension range specialist and co-author.

In 70 compact pages, the guide covers basic sage-grouse biology, life stages, habitat needs, predator impacts, conservation planning and sagebrush monitoring.

More than 40 original Wyoming photographs and seven state-level maps illustrate the lives of these birds that coexist with cattle, other livestock and approximately 350 vertebrate wildlife species, including songbirds and small mammals.

Full-color photos show males in fall mating displays, the sagebrush shape that provides winter cover for nesting females, and the broadleaf flowering plants (forbs)  and insects that provide protein-rich food for chicks in spring. A wire mesh escape ramp in a livestock tank is presented as a simple alteration to reduce sage-grouse drowning.

“Sagebrush ecosystems are complex, and efforts to conserve sage-grouse are multifaceted,” said lead author and photographer Leanne Correll.

Correll heads an agriculture and natural resources consulting business in Saratoga and earned a master’s degree in rangeland ecology and watershed management from UW in 2017.

Wyoming is a sage-grouse stronghold, encompassing almost a quarter of the range-wide habitat and 37 percent of known male populations – more than any other state.

“Those who own or manage sage-grouse habitat play a critical role in conserving this umbrella species in Wyoming and the West,” said Correll. “They were the catalyst for developing this guide.”

Landowner Guide to Sage-grouse Conservation in Wyoming co-authors with Correll are Rebecca Burton and University of Wyoming professors Scasta and Jeffrey Beck.

Contributing support and expertise were local ranchers and conservation experts, other UW faculty members, and representatives of county, state, and federal agencies, including the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, the Bureau of Land Management, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

The guide is one of many free publications available at  bit.ly/UWEpubs, covering sage-grouse, sagebrush, grasslands, grazing, conservation, and ranch economics.

For more information, contact Scasta at (307) 766-2337 or jscasta@uwyo.edu.

Why are these teens all smiles?

Bright-faced teens outside, 3 males in back, three females in front.
Gavin Simmons, Ian Siegusmund, Morgan Sanchez, Lukas Simmons, Mishelle Frame, and Torree Spatig of Uinta County are among the first enrolled in ANSC 1009. The UW course is open to all Wyoming 4-H’ers in high school.

They’re honing their animal production skills (and earning college credit) in a new University of Wyoming course, Introduction to Animal Science (ANSC 1009), which connects high school students with UW via field experiences, extension workshops, online content, and Zoom conference calls with animal science professors. To read more and learn ways UW Extension connects with Wyoming, see CONNECT 2017.