UW Extension bulletin explains grass-legume system benefits

Image of publication cover            Adopting grass-legume systems instead of only legumes or only grasses can improve overall productivity and profitability, according to research published in a new bulletin from the University of Wyoming Extension.

Grass-Legume Mixtures Can Improve Soil Health, B-1328, explains the increases are through production cost reductions and improving long-term soil health by boosting soil properties and microbial activities.

The findings are from a 2010-2014 field study at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center near Lingle.

The free bulletin is available for viewing or downloading by going to www.uwyo.edu/uwe and clicking on the Find a Publication link. Type in the bulletin title or number. The bulletin is available in pdf, HTML or ePub formats.

New extension bulletin describes best methods for forage kochia establishment

Picture of forage kochia
Forage kochia

Forage kochia should be planted in early spring for the highest densities, according to research by the University of Wyoming Extension.

“Forage Kochia Establishment: Effects of Planting Time and Grass Mixtures,” B-1318, describes results from field studies in 2014-2015 by extension forage specialist Anowar Islam and graduate student Parmeshwor Aryal.

Forage kochia is a highly nutritious semi-shrub that can be used for forage or reclaiming degraded areas. Their tests at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center near Lingle included seeding with six perennial cool-season grass species.

Establishment was highly dependent upon spring moisture. They found overall density was higher in April regardless of monoculture planting or with grass mixtures.

The bulletin is available for free download by going to www.uwyo.edu/uwe and clicking on Find a Publication. Enter the title or bulletin number in the search field. The bulletin is available in pdf, HTML and ePub formats.

For more information, contact Islam at 307-766-4151 or at mislam@uwyo.edu.

UW research center near Lingle hosts annual forage field day

Extension forage specialist Anowar Islam

More than 11 producer, university and industry presentations plus field demonstrations are part of the sixth-annual Forage Field Day Tuesday, June 12, near Lingle.

Registration begins at 8 a.m., and the day concludes at 4:30 p.m. at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center (SAREC), said Anowar Islam, forage specialist with the University of Wyoming Extension and who is coordinating the event. Registration is also available at bit.ly/wyoforage2018.

More information and a schedule are at www.uwyo.edu/uwe/forage-field-day. Lunch is free, and RSVPs are requested by June 1 by calling SAREC at 307-837-2000, Islam at 307-766-4151 or the Goshen County Extension Office at 307-532-2436.

A producer’s panel discussion is in the afternoon, and other topics include: cover crops for forage; hay quality; low lignin alfalfa; soil health; how to manage weeds; irrigation strategies; potassium and harvest management; alfalfa, forage sorghum, chickpea, grasses and other forages; and integrating livestock into cropping systems.

Contact Islam at the above number for more information.

UW Extension bulletin explains grass-legume mixtures boost forage

Grass-legume mixtures benefit forage productivity, quality and stand persistence, according to a new bulletin from the University of Wyoming Extension.

Extension forage specialist Anowar Islam

The results are from three years of tests at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center near Lingle, said extension forage specialist Anowar Islam, one of the authors.

At least 25 percent legumes in a mixed stand can produce higher yield and quality than monoculture alfalfa and nitrogen fertilized grasses, he said. A 50-50 percent mixture would be the optimum seeding proportion of meadow bromegrass and alfalfa under Wyoming conditions.

The bulletin, “Grass-legume mixtures improve forage yield, quality, stand persistence,” B-1309, is available for viewing and free download by going towww.uwyo.edu/uwe and clicking on Find a Publication.  Type the title or number in the search field. The bulletin is available in pdf, HTML or ePub formats.