UW president special guest at sixth annual forage field day near Lingle

Photograph of Anowar Islam speaking to field day attendees
Anowar Islam, University of Wyoming Extension forage specialist

University of Wyoming president Laurie Nichols is the special guest at the sixth annual forage field day Tuesday, June 12, near Lingle.

The day of presentations and workshops begins at 8 a.m. with registration and refreshments and concludes at 4:30 p.m., all at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center (SAREC), said Anowar Islam, forage specialist with the University of Wyoming Extension and who is coordinating the event.

“This year’s event is very demanding and farmer-focused, especially for those who want alfalfa and improved forages in their cropping/animal production systems and improve their yield, quality and profitability,” said Islam.

Lunch is free, and RSVPs are requested by June 1 by calling SAREC at 307-837-2000, Islam at 307-766-4151 or the Goshen County Extension Office at 307-532-2436. Registration is also available at bit.ly/wyoforage2018.

More than 11 presentations are planned.

“A wide range of forage-related topics will be covered by highly experienced experts including forage production and management, low lignin alfalfa, cover crops for forage, hay quality, soil health, weed control and irrigation management,” said Islam

A producer’s panel discussion is in the afternoon, with the forage field and equipment demonstration to follow. Seed suppliers and machinery dealership equipment demonstrations are planned.

Other field day topics include irrigation strategies; potassium and harvest management; alfalfa, forage sorghum, chickpea, grasses and other forages; and integrating livestock into cropping systems.

More information and a schedule are at www.uwyo.edu/uwe/forage-field-day. Contact Islam at the above number for more information.

New extension bulletin describes best methods for forage kochia establishment

Picture of forage kochia
Forage kochia

Forage kochia should be planted in early spring for the highest densities, according to research by the University of Wyoming Extension.

“Forage Kochia Establishment: Effects of Planting Time and Grass Mixtures,” B-1318, describes results from field studies in 2014-2015 by extension forage specialist Anowar Islam and graduate student Parmeshwor Aryal.

Forage kochia is a highly nutritious semi-shrub that can be used for forage or reclaiming degraded areas. Their tests at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center near Lingle included seeding with six perennial cool-season grass species.

Establishment was highly dependent upon spring moisture. They found overall density was higher in April regardless of monoculture planting or with grass mixtures.

The bulletin is available for free download by going to www.uwyo.edu/uwe and clicking on Find a Publication. Enter the title or bulletin number in the search field. The bulletin is available in pdf, HTML and ePub formats.

For more information, contact Islam at 307-766-4151 or at mislam@uwyo.edu.

Applications open for annual Wyoming-Nebraska ranch management practicum

            Applications are being accepted for a ranch management school that filled to maximum last year and has had hundreds of cattle producers attend.

The eight-day, multi-season High Plains Ranch Practicum is June 13-14, Aug. 23-24, Sept. 26-27 and Nov. 1-2, said Blake Hauptman, University of Wyoming Extension educator.

Laramie County Community College in Cheyenne is this year’s host site. The practicum is supported and developed by the University of Wyoming Extension and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

The practicum is the longest-running ranch management school in the region, Hauptman said, with ranchers attending last year from Wyoming, Colorado, Montana, Nebraska and South Dakota.

Specific topics are: unit cost of production; grazing and forages; economic analysis tools; personnel management and family working relationships; and nutrition, reproduction and body condition scoring.

The school is hands-on and focused on generating discussions and not lectures, said Hauptman.

“There are opportunities to visit ranches and hear from engaging guest speakers who share the tools and principles they’ve used to make their ranch businesses more profitable while improving their land, lifestyles and relationships,” he said.

Course fee is $600 for individuals and $900 for two from the same ranch and covers materials, instructor costs and meals. More about the practicum is at http://hpranchpracticum.com.

For more information or an application, contact Aaron Berger with UN-L at 308-235-3122 or aberger2@unl.edu; UW Extension educator Dallas Mount at 307-322-3667 or dmount@uwyo.edu; or Hauptman at 307-283-1192 or bhauptma@uwyo.edu.

UW research center near Lingle hosts annual forage field day

Extension forage specialist Anowar Islam

More than 11 producer, university and industry presentations plus field demonstrations are part of the sixth-annual Forage Field Day Tuesday, June 12, near Lingle.

Registration begins at 8 a.m., and the day concludes at 4:30 p.m. at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center (SAREC), said Anowar Islam, forage specialist with the University of Wyoming Extension and who is coordinating the event. Registration is also available at bit.ly/wyoforage2018.

More information and a schedule are at www.uwyo.edu/uwe/forage-field-day. Lunch is free, and RSVPs are requested by June 1 by calling SAREC at 307-837-2000, Islam at 307-766-4151 or the Goshen County Extension Office at 307-532-2436.

A producer’s panel discussion is in the afternoon, and other topics include: cover crops for forage; hay quality; low lignin alfalfa; soil health; how to manage weeds; irrigation strategies; potassium and harvest management; alfalfa, forage sorghum, chickpea, grasses and other forages; and integrating livestock into cropping systems.

Contact Islam at the above number for more information.

Evanston hosting second-annual Wyoming-Utah Ag Days

 

Bridger Feuz, extension livestock marketing specialist
Bridger Feuz, extension livestock marketing specialist

Topics ranging from the cattle market outlook to sage grouse and deworming sheep are among topics at Wyoming-Utah Ag Days Tuesday and Wednesday, Jan. 23-24, in Evanston.

Sessions are 10 a.m.-3 p.m. each day at the Evanston Roundhouse, 1500 Main St., said Bridger Feuz, University of Wyoming Extension educator. Lunch is served each day if participants RSVP before 9 a.m. Jan. 22.

This is the second year for the program.

“The workshops are full of powerful presenters and timely and relevant topics,” said Feuz.

Day 1 topics include irrigation of forages, why grow relationships with the next generation, cattle market outlook, raising backyard chickens, rancher rules of thumb, backyard livestock production, winter livestock feeding and irrigated alfalfa variety performance.

Day 2 topics are weed identification and control, sage grouse and grazing, quantifying deworming in Wyoming sheep, litigation between the Western Watersheds Project and federal land management agencies, landscape-based riparian grazing, beekeeping 101, modern meat cuts (hands-on demonstration) and a question-and-answer session about meat and meat cutting.

Feuz said Cat Urbigkit, co-owner and editor of The Shepherd magazine, will speak about guardian dog use in large carnivore country during her keynote during lunch Tuesday. Urbigkit owns a western Wyoming sheep and cattle ranch. Feuz said she raises working livestock guardian dogs and travels the globe learning about guardian dog use in large carnivore country.

“People can come for the whole time on both days or pick and choose individual topics they wish to attend,” said Feuz.

For more information or to RSVP, contact the Uinta County Extension office at 307-783-0570.