Cheatgrass, crop trial data among field day topics at research center near Lingle

Brian Connely (center), weed and pest district supervisor from Natrona County, discusses his team's approach to managing cheatgrass in the Cheatgrass Challenge during last year's field day.
Brian Connely (center), weed and pest district supervisor from Natrona County, discusses his team’s approach to managing cheatgrass in the Cheatgrass Challenge during last year’s field day.

Cheatgrass renovation efforts, Roundup Ready alfalfa and recognition of the Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station’s 125 years in Wyoming are among field day topics Thursday, Aug. 25, at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center (SAREC) near Lingle.

Registration begins at 4 p.m., and research presentations are 4:20-5:30 p.m. Recognition of the Agricultural Experiment Station’s 125th anniversary is 5:30-6 p.m., followed by dinner.

Pistol and Pete, AES’s draft horse team, are scheduled to be present, pulling the college’s restored sheep wagon. SAREC is one of four research and extension centers under the direction of AES. The others are near Powell, Sheridan and Laramie.

David Kruger, agricultural liaison librarian with University of Wyoming Libraries, will provide perspective on AES’ history in Wyoming. AES was started one year after the last soldiers left the decommissioned Fort Laramie and one year after Wyoming was admitted to the union.

Additional field day topics include bluetongue disease research, quinoa, wheat variety trial results, wheat weather monitoring, beneficial insects for alfalfa and birdsfoot trefoil. Information about these and other continuing research at all research and extension centers is available at bit.ly/2016bulletin.

RSVPs for dinner are requested by Wednesday, Aug. 17. Contact Kelly Greenwald at 307-837-2000 or at kgreenwa@uwyo.edu.

The field day is in conjunction with the Goshen County Chamber of Commerce After Hours.

Ask-a-scientist at UW research and extension field day near Lingle

Graduate student Cara Noseworthy discusses cheatgrass research at last year's field day at the james C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center near Lingle.
Graduate student Cara Noseworthy discusses cheatgrass research at last year’s field day at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center near Lingle.

Attendees can ask-a-scientist during the field day at the University of Wyoming research and extension (R&E) center near Lingle Thursday, Aug. 20.

The field day begins with registration and a welcome at 3 p.m. and ends with a 5:30 dinner, all at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center (SAREC) near Lingle.

“A recent report indicated people appreciate receiving information directly from a scientist because they are respected and a creditable source of information,” said Bret Hess, associate dean of research in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and director of the Agricultural Experiment Station, which directs four R&E centers in the state.

Three SAREC research projects will be presented in-depth followed by three-minute summaries of research, then tours of plots and research poster presentations.

The schedule includes:

3:20 p.m. – Cheatgrass Restoration Challenge at SAREC; blue tongue disease study; Rogers Research Site activities

4 p.m. – Fastest three minutes: Wheat variety trial and wheat weather monitoring results; beneficial insects for alfalfa; pollinator plot work; cultural practices influencing dry bean harvest efficiency; planting date and residential herbicide effects on inter-seeded winter forage crops; research associate Jerry Nachtman retirement appreciation

4:30/4:45 p.m. – Plot stops: Pollinator plots and high tunnel research; grass-legume mixture for improved forage yield, forage quality, soil properties and economic return; beneficial insects for alfalfa; Goss’s wilt (causes systemic infection and wilting of corn plants, as well as severe leaf blighting)

Research poster presentations: Management of Rhizoctonia disease of sugar beets; winter wheat/cover crop/compost study; beneficial insects for alfalfa

The field days bulletin showing research at SAREC and the centers at Laramie, Powell and Sheridan is at http://bit.ly/2015agresearch.

UW weed specialist invites teams to compete in very public cheatgrass challenge

Brian Mealor, right, and Jim Heitholt, head of the Department of Plant Sciences, last summer near the site of the cheatgrass challenge at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center near Lingle.
Brian Mealor, right, and Jim Heitholt, head of the Department of Plant Sciences, last summer near the site of the cheatgrass challenge at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center near Lingle.

University of Wyoming scientists hope marrying “Top Chef” with “The Amazing Race” and “The Biggest Loser” will be a win in the struggle against cheatgrass in Wyoming.

UW Extension weed specialist Brian Mealor is putting out a casting call for teams to enter his Wyoming Restoration Challenge. Teams will create their menus for success during a three-year contest to rid land near Lingle of the most cheatgrass and restore the pasture into a more productive and diverse plant community.

Mealor, an assistant professor in the Department of Plant Sciences, has spent years traveling the state and seeing sites invaded by weeds. Traditional research calls for a certain protocol – demonstration plots and research plots. During those trips across the state, he’s seen many people doing their own kinds of cheatgrass management.

“My thought was, let’s open it up to see if we can put different approaches head-to-head in a fun, competitive environment and see how they do instead of just researchers doing stuff,” said Mealor, in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. “Let’s have other people involved and make it a fun, educational program at the same time. It’s a different model for doing extension.”

Continue reading UW weed specialist invites teams to compete in very public cheatgrass challenge

Wyoming brucellosis picture, more than 36 sessions part of annual farm and ranch days

Extension educator Alex Malcolm during a 2014 session.
Extension educator Alex Malcolm during a 2014 session.

Brucellosis in Wyoming and more than 36 sessions ranging from heifer selection, cheatgrass and rangelands to the new farm bill are part of the 31st annual Fremont County Farm and Ranch Days in Riverton.

Sessions are Wednesday and Thursday, Feb. 11-12, in the Armory Building at the Fremont County Fairgrounds. Sessions both days start at 9 a.m., and the last sessions begin at 3 p.m. The Fremont County office of University of Wyoming Extension sponsors the annual event.

The schedule and more information is at http://bit.ly/2015farmandranch. Sponsors provide free lunches both days.

Private applicator pesticide training is Wednesday, and Frank Galey, dean of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Wyoming, is that day’s featured lunch speaker. Galey is chairman of the Wyoming Brucellosis Coordination Team and will discuss brucellosis in Wyoming.
Sessions include farmers markets, dehydrating food, rodent identification for control, vehicle titling and licensing, custom vaccination programs for cattle, cover crops, grain bin safety, elderly scams and identification theft, beef prices for 2015, range and pasture insurance, soil health and many more.

UW research center open house near Lingle Aug. 21

Extension plant pathologist Bill Stump at a previous SAREC open house.
Extension plant pathologist Bill Stump at a previous SAREC open house.

Research to help producer livestock and crop decisions and profitability are offered during the open house Thursday, Aug. 21, at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center (SAREC) near Lingle.
The day concludes with dinner. RSVPs are requested by Saturday, Aug. 16. Contact Kelly Greenwald at 307-837-2000 or at kgreenwa@uwyo.edu.
The schedule is:
3 p.m. – Introductions
3:20 – Presentation by animal scientist Doug Landblom of North Dakota State University, “Cost effectiveness of various wintering rations on finishing and profitability of market steers.” Landblom is a specialist at the Dickinson Research Extension Center and whose primary focus is beef cattle nutrition and management.
4 – Three-minute research presentations
4:30 – Research and poster presentations
5:30 – Dinner

Participants can visit field plots/research of their choice and meet with researchers.

Continue reading UW research center open house near Lingle Aug. 21