University of Wyoming Extension News

High tunnel, weed control information part of UW research center field day

Research will include high tunnel production results by extension horticulturist Karen Panter.

Research will include high tunnel production results by extension horticulturist Karen Panter.

High tunnel vegetable production and weed control and gardening in Laramie are research highlights during the University of Wyoming Laramie Research and Extension Center field day Thursday, Aug. 27.

The field day is at the Greenhouse Complex at the southwest corner of 30th and Harney streets in Laramie.

Registration begins at 4 p.m. with opening remarks at 4:30. UW Extension horticulture specialist Karen Panter will provide high tunnel production information, former extension weed specialist Brian Mealor and UW weed scientist Andrew Kniss will discuss weed control, and state Master Gardener coordinator Chris Hilgert will talk about gardening in Laramie.

A meal prepared and served by the UW Food Science Club begins at 7 p.m.

UW agriculture college publications receive national honors

CONNECTThree publications from the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Wyoming and published in 2014 received honors in the Association for Communication Excellence (ACE) Critique and Awards program.
The awards were presented during the association’s international conference in Charleston, S.C., in June.
* CONNECT, which features UW Extension educators and their engagement with Wyoming residents, received the Gold Award in One- to Full-color Popular Publications.
* Reflections, which showcases research in the college, received two silver awards: one in Technical Publications and the online, interactive version in the Electronic Publications category.
* Ag News, the newsletter for the college, tied for a Bronze Award in Newsletters.
The publications are produced through extension’s Office of Communications and Technology.
ACE is an international association of communicators, educators and information technologists. The organization offers professional development and networking for individuals who extend knowledge about agriculture, natural resources and life and human sciences.

UW bulletin highlights agriculture research across Wyoming

field daysTraditional and alternative farm crops, cattle, sheep and swine are among research projects covered in the fifth annual Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station Field Days Bulletin.

The 2015 FDB also highlights vegetable and herb production, irrigation practices, fertilization, weed control and plant and livestock disease research.

“This bulletin contributes to our efforts to inform Wyoming citizens and others of the research being conducted at the four WAES research and extension centers, by members of the University of Wyoming College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and by others who have received funding from WAES,” said WAES director Bret Hess.

Approximately 90 one- and two-page articles summarize completed and in-progress research projects within the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, at the R&E centers near Laramie, Lingle, Powell and Sheridan, and at participating farms and ranches in Wyoming.

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Diseases prompt caution from Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory director

Will Laegreid is director of the Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory

Will Laegreid is director of the Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory

Tularemia, plague, West Nile virus, rabies, vesicular stomatitis – Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory experts are cautioning residents to monitor not only their pets and livestock, but also themselves this summer.

Several cases of tularemia in wildlife and domestic animals have been diagnosed by the WSVL, including in Albany, Platte and Washakie counties, said Will Laegreid, WSVL director.

“There have been a number of human tularemia cases in Colorado this summer and two so far in Weston County, and we would like to prevent any more cases in Wyoming if possible,” Laegreid said. The Wyoming Department of Health reported the cases.

Caused by bacteria, tularemia – also called rabbit fever – is commonly associated with rabbits and rodents, he said, and outbreaks often coincide with booming rabbit populations, as seen in Wyoming this year.

“Tularemia may be quite serious in humans, who may become infected through direct contact with wild rabbits, prairie dogs, voles and other rodents through insect or tick bites or through ingestion of contaminated food or water,” said Laegreid.

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Ask-a-scientist at UW research and extension field day near Lingle

Graduate student Cara Noseworthy discusses cheatgrass research at last year's field day at the james C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center near Lingle.

Graduate student Cara Noseworthy discusses cheatgrass research at last year’s field day at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center near Lingle.

Attendees can ask-a-scientist during the field day at the University of Wyoming research and extension (R&E) center near Lingle Thursday, Aug. 20.

The field day begins with registration and a welcome at 3 p.m. and ends with a 5:30 dinner, all at the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center (SAREC) near Lingle.

“A recent report indicated people appreciate receiving information directly from a scientist because they are respected and a creditable source of information,” said Bret Hess, associate dean of research in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and director of the Agricultural Experiment Station, which directs four R&E centers in the state.

Three SAREC research projects will be presented in-depth followed by three-minute summaries of research, then tours of plots and research poster presentations.

The schedule includes:

3:20 p.m. – Cheatgrass Restoration Challenge at SAREC; blue tongue disease study; Rogers Research Site activities

4 p.m. – Fastest three minutes: Wheat variety trial and wheat weather monitoring results; beneficial insects for alfalfa; pollinator plot work; cultural practices influencing dry bean harvest efficiency; planting date and residential herbicide effects on inter-seeded winter forage crops; research associate Jerry Nachtman retirement appreciation

4:30/4:45 p.m. – Plot stops: Pollinator plots and high tunnel research; grass-legume mixture for improved forage yield, forage quality, soil properties and economic return; beneficial insects for alfalfa; Goss’s wilt (causes systemic infection and wilting of corn plants, as well as severe leaf blighting)

Research poster presentations: Management of Rhizoctonia disease of sugar beets; winter wheat/cover crop/compost study; beneficial insects for alfalfa

The field days bulletin showing research at SAREC and the centers at Laramie, Powell and Sheridan is at http://bit.ly/2015agresearch.