UW bulletin details research, teaching opportunities at Rogers Research Site

UW bulletin details research, teaching opportunities at Rogers Research Site
Rogers Research Site and nearly 100,000 acres surrounding Laramie Peak burned during the 2012 Arapaho Fire, which dramatically changed research and instructional potential there and on neighboring lands.

Research, extension and instructional opportunities relating to forestry, wildlife and other natural resources await University of Wyoming faculty, staff, students and outside collaborators, according to a new bulletin published by the Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station (WAES).

The bulletin details the potential for such activities at the UW-owned Rogers Research Site, a 320-acre parcel in the Laramie Mountains near Laramie Peak in southeast Wyoming.

Bulletin 3 and others in the series can be downloaded at bit.ly/UWEpubs. Enter Rogers Research Site into the search bar.

Williams said RRS along with adjacent State of Wyoming-owned parcels provide more than 1,000 acres of mountainous land for potential research and teaching.

“The RRS is being developed to specifically address forestry- and wildlife-related issues,” he said.

Short- and long-term goals for the site are also detailed in RRS Bulletin 3, “A Conceptual Framework to Guide Research and Teaching at Rogers Research Site, north Laramie Mountains, Wyoming.”

The bulletin, co-authored by WAES editor Robert Waggener, also contains a story about the late Col. William C. Rogers, who bequeathed the land to UW in 2002.

The property and nearly 100,000 acres surrounding Laramie Peak burned during the 2012 Arapaho Fire, which dramatically changed research and instructional potential at RRS and neighboring lands.

“The investigations at RRS are now focused on regeneration of forests post-fire,” said Williams, who has led much of the early planning and research at the site in extreme northeast Albany County. “RRS is also positioned ecologically and politically to address other land-management issues related to water, soil erosion, invasive species, recreational use, climate change and management of nutrients in soil, to name a few.”

RRS is under management of WAES and one of its four research and extension centers, the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture R&E Center (SAREC) near Lingle.

“The research plots that were established on regeneration of the forests, pre- and post-fire soils comparisons and other baseline information collected will provide the basis for learning for decades to come,” said UW Professor John Tanaka, director of SAREC and associate director of WAES.

Many people, both within and outside UW, were involved in early planning at RRS, including former SAREC director Jim Freeburn.

“Working with the neighbors and people interested in the Rogers Research Site was one of the most rewarding experiences of my career with UW,” Freeburn said. “The residents of that area care about their neighbors and the natural resource base in the Laramie Mountains.”

A vegetation mapping survey at RRS, preliminary findings from a ponderosa pine restoration study and pre- and post-fire soils research will be detailed in upcoming bulletins. UW students and their faculty mentors, along with outside collaborators, have been involved in the projects.

For more information about research at RRS and the bulletins, call John Tanaka at 307-766-5130 or email jtanaka@uwyo.edu.