Hatch brings Thomas Jefferson’s revolutionary gardens to Laramie

Gray-haired man, arms crossed, stands smiling beside vegetable garden.
Peter Hatch, retired director of gardens and grounds at Monticello.

Thomas Jefferson’s 57 years of gardening notes, dated 1767 to 1824, guided a modern restoration of his two-acre kitchen garden led by Peter Hatch, director of gardens and grounds at Monticello, now retired.

The 1,000-foot-long garden has been called a living expression of Jefferson’s genius and distinctly American attitudes. Hatch will give a free public presentation, “Thomas Jefferson’s Revolutionary Gardens,” in Laramie, October 12. The talk is 4:30-5:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the Berry Center on the University of Wyoming campus.

Hatch will discuss the history of horticulture from the perspective of the famous scientist and president and discuss some of Jefferson’s hundreds of vegetable varieties, his foundational seed-saving techniques, and the experimentation of his later years.

Copies of Hatch’s book, A Rich Spot of Earth, will be available for signing.

The event is sponsored by the UW College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, the Department of Plant Sciences, and ACRES Student Farm.

For more information, contact Anne Leonard, UW College of Agriculture and Natural Resources coordinator of college affairs, at (307) 766-4134 or aleonard@uwyo.edu.