UW Extension educator receives national achievement honor

UW Extension educator Mae Smith describes different plant parts to youths attending a recent  resource education camp.
UW Extension educator Mae Smith describes different plant parts to youths attending a recent resource education camp.

A University of Wyoming Extension educator serving the Big Horn Basin and Wind River Reservation has received the Achievement Award from the National Association of County Agricultural Agents.

Rangeland resources educator Mae Smith, based in Greybull, received the award during the association’s annual meeting July 12-16 in Sioux Falls, S.D.

Smith joined UW Extension in 2011, and said her favorite teaching opportunities are filming the “Exploring the Nature of Wyoming” educational videos, identifying plants in the field and organizing the Annie’s Project series for women in agriculture.

Smith is also coordinator for the national award-winning Barnyards & Backyards magazine. The magazine addresses resource management issues faced by Wyoming small-acreage owners. Smith has been an active member of the Society for Range Management for 10 years, serving on national committees and planning the Wyoming youth camp.

Smith serves Big Horn, Fremont, Hot Springs, Park, and Washakie counties and the Wind River Reservation.

U.S., French predator compensation policy study top research story

Associate Professor Ben Rashford in wolf habitat in the French Alps.
Associate Professor Ben Rashford in wolf habitat in the French Alps.

Scientists detailing predator policies in the United States and France was voted the top article in “Reflections,” the research magazine of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Wyoming.

How clustering development in the wildland urban interface could potentially dramatically lower firefighting costs was voted top student story. An anonymous review team at the university selected the top stories.

“Reflections” was published this month and will be available at the Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station based in the college, research and extension centers at Lingle, Laramie, Powell and Sheridan, at UW Extension offices and at college of agriculture-related venues. An online version with accompanying videos is at http://bit.ly/uwreflections2015.

There are about 300 wolves in Wyoming and about 250 in France, but the two nations’ predator compensation approaches and policies are different, explained authors associate professor Benjamin Rashford, senior research scientist Thomas Foulke, professor David Taylor, and Jordan Steele, former graduate student, all in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics.

Continue reading U.S., French predator compensation policy study top research story

Douglas workshop tackles reclamation plans on private, public lands

Stahl Pete
Pete Stahl

A workshop addressing the soil, water and vegetation components and the monitoring requirements of a reclamation plan is Wednesday, July 22, at the Douglas campus of Eastern Wyoming College, 203 N. 6th St.

Presentations are relevant to public and private land, organizers said.

Online registration is requested by Monday, July 20, at http://bit.ly/douglasworkshop, while walk-in registration is still welcome the morning of the workshop, beginning at 8:30. Presentations are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The $20 fee includes lunch.

“We’ve had great responses to our workshops,” said Pete Stahl, Wyoming Reclamation and Restoration Center director and professor in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management at the University of Wyoming. 

The WRRC is hosting the sessions.

“This workshop should provide practitioners and all involved in land reclamation with the tools and information to develop a reclamation plan,” said Stahl.

Presenters are from the energy industry, Bureau of Land Management, UW College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and private consulting firms.

For more information, contact Calvin Strom or Kristina Hufford at 307-766-5432 or wrrc@uwyo.edu