Extension webinar addresses credit, credit score

Financial pitfalls can challenge every age and experience level.

Understanding how credit can affect the future can seem impossible, but on Thursday, Sept. 5, University of Wyoming Extension educator Mary Martin is presenting a free webinar beginning at 7 p.m.: “Managing Your Credit and Credit Score.”

The session is the first in a series on avoiding financial pitfalls. Find more details, including how to attend through the Web or phone, at http://bit.ly/managecredit. For more information, contact Martin at 307-733-3087.

Ag appreciation barbecue fuels student organizations, scholarships

Ag students and members of agricultural student organizations prepare and serve the food.
Ag students and members of agricultural student organizations prepare and serve the food.

The 31st annual Ag Appreciation Day Barbecue is noon-1:30 Saturday, Sept. 14, in Tailgate Park near War Memorial Stadium prior to the University of Wyoming-University of Northern Colorado football game.

The barbecue, part of Ag Appreciation Weekend at the University of Wyoming, raises money for agricultural student scholarships and organizations. Tickets can be purchased at the event or in advance by contacting Kelly Wiseman, Office ofAcademic and Student Programs, in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at 307-766-4135. Adult tickets are $10, children are $5 and children under 5 are free.

Event sponsors include the college, local businesses, agricultural groups and individual donors. Wyoming beef, pork and lamb sandwiches are prepared and served by members of the college’s student organizations.

Last year’s barbecue served 600 patrons and generated more than $6,500 in support of the college judging teams, student organizations and scholarships.

Bulletin examines renewable energy system return on investment

The benefits and pitfalls of using simple payback calculations to determine a renewable energy system’s return on investment are described in a University of Wyoming Extension publication.

Simple payback determines the number of years for the energy savings from a renewable energy system to offset the initial cost of the investment, wrote researchers in the Department of Agricultural and AppliedEconomics in “Renewable Energy Investment Analysis,” B-1235

They use examples to show how the formula works; however, they caution simple payback does not take into account electricity price escalation, cannot easily accommodate variable rate electricity prices, is not well-suited to comparing alternative investments and does not factor in theenergy savings and costs that occur after the payback period.

There are alternative analyses that solve most of the problems of simple payback, they wrote.

The bulletin is available for free download by going to www.uwyo.edu/ces and clicking Publications on the left-hand side of the page. Type B-1235 in the search field.

In-depth presentations part of Laramie research center open house

Doug Zalesky
Doug Zalesky

In-depth presentations that highlight research projects at the University of Wyoming’s Laramie Research and Extension Center are part of the open house at its Greenhouse Complex Thursday, Aug. 29, in Laramie.

The new format is based upon suggestions from last year’s open house, said Doug Zalesky, LREC director.

“This gives us time for questions and gives the presenters more time to provide information withouttrying to hurry through their information,” he said.

The Greenhouse Complex is at the corner of North 30th and East Harney streets. Tours begin at 4 p.m. and dinner is at 5 p.m. Presentations are 6-7:30 p.m. and include weed control, native plants and revegetation, high tunnel production and wind and solar power options.

“I am excited to have extension energy coordinator Milt Geiger provide information on green energy options that can apply both to producers and to those with high tunnels or gardens,” said Zalesky. “ It is not possible to highlight all of the projects and activities that are ongoing at the greenhouse, so each year we try to highlight new ones.”

Continue reading In-depth presentations part of Laramie research center open house

Extension bulletin guides successful forage establishment

Producer Monte Lerwick at the Forage Field Day earlier this summer.
Producer Monte Lerwick at the forage field day earlier this summer.

Successfully establishing forage involves understanding its needs and using proven seeding methods, according to a new bulletin from the University of Wyoming Extension.

“Thin and poorly established forage stands encourage weeds to invade,” said bulletin author Anowar Islam, extension foragespecialist and assistant professor in the Department of Plant Sciences in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources.  “Considering all these negative consequences, along with the risks and costs associated with poor forage stand establishment, increasing chances for success is essential.”

“Successful Forage Establishment,” B-1248, is available for free download by going to www.uwyo.edu/ces and clicking on Publications on the left-hand side of the page. Type the bulletin title or number in the search field.