Applications now open for Uinta County Leadership Institute

Kimberly Chapman
Kimberly Chapman

Applications are being accepted for the 2013-2014 class of the Uinta County Leadership Institute.

The deadline is 5 p.m. Friday, Aug. 16, said Kimberly Chapman, UW Extension community development educator. Applications can be submitted to the Uinta County Leadership Institute Sponsor Headquarters within the Uinta County extension office in Evanston.

The nine-month program meets the second Wednesday each month from September to May, and classes focus on community issues, resources and diversity, she said.

Participants complete additional community-based experiences to supplement the course; members engage in activities with local groups that represent education, government, healthcare and non-profit organizations. More information is at http://bit.ly/uintaleaders.

The program seeks to enhance leadership skills in Uinta County residents, assess leadership styles and discuss conflict resolution techniques, said Chapman.

Application forms and additional information are available at the UW Extension office in Evanston. The class is limited to 25, and tuition is $299. Attendance is required at the first session Wednesday, Sept. 11.

For more information, contact Chapman at Extension@uintacounty.com or 307-783-0570.

High Tunnel Handbook available from UW Extension

     Vegetables grown in the Powell Research and Extension Center high tunnels.
Vegetables grown in the Powell Research and Extension Center high tunnels.

Management techniques surrounding high tunnel vegetable production are discussed in a new publication from University of Wyoming Extension.

The “High Tunnel Handbook,” B-1234, identifies key parts of high tunnel production and evaluates many frequently asked questions. The 55-page document discusses soil management, growth of various plants in a high tunnel scenario and management of pests and diseases.

Contributor Kelli Belden discusses specific concerns of organic crops in high tunnel beds in the “Organic Production in High Tunnels” portion.

Contributors to the publication include Karen Panter, UW Extension horticulture specialist; Belden, former director of the UW Soil Testing Laboratory; Jeff Edwards, UW Extension pesticide applicator training coordinator and small acre/horticulture specialist; Sandra Frost, UW Extension educator for crops; Axel Garcia y Garcia, UW Extension irrigation specialist; Abdel Mesbah, weed research scientist; and Scott Richard, Wyoming crop producer.

The publication is available for free download by going to http://www.uwyo.edu/ces, clicking on Publications on the left-hand side and typing the publication number in the search field. A hardcopy version is available for $15. Click on the title, High Tunnel Handbook, and then Request Copy under Hard Copy Price.

New publication discusses trees that survive Wyoming’s climate

Trees no longer managed by the Cheyenne Horticultural Field Station are the inspiration for a new bulletin suggesting trees to homeowners that will survive Wyoming’s climate.

“Scrappy Trees: Raw and Exposed,” B-1243, discusses 19 of the trees that remain from research conducted during the mid-1930s to early 1950s. When the research focus of the stationchanged in the 1950s, the trees were no longer pruned, but many healthy trees still flourish.

The UW Extension bulletin provides a general description, hardiness, diseases and insects and landscape value for each of the 19 trees, said author Wyatt Feuz.

Feuz is a University of Wyoming Extension technician. Co-authors Bridger Feuz and Hudson Hill are University of Wyoming Extension educators.

The publication is available for free download by going to http://www.uwyo.edu/ces, clicking on Publications on the left-hand side and typing the publication number in thesearch field. A hardcopy is available for $5. Click on the title, Scrappy Trees: Raw and Exposed, then Bridger Feuz under Hard Copy Price.

Applications now open for Park County Leadership Institute

Tara Kuipers
Tara Kuipers

Applications are being accepted for the 2013-2014 class of the Park County Leadership Institute (PCLI).

The deadline is 5 p.m. Friday, Aug. 2, said Tara Kuipers, UW Extension community development educator. Applications can be submitted at the Park County Courthouse or Park County Fairgrounds or by email to Kuipers.

The eight-month program meets one day per month from September to April, and classes focus on forming leadership skills like conflict management, acceptance and management of change and initiation of social action, she said.

Participants select additional activities to supplement the course; members attend government and non-profit board meetings, complete a group project for the benefit of Park County residents or many other community-based activities that promote collaborative decision making.

Continue reading Applications now open for Park County Leadership Institute

Southeastern Wyoming winter wheat survey available

Bill Stump
Bill Stump

Crop specialists from the University of Wyoming visited field sites in southeastern Wyoming to assess winter wheat health in June.

Wendy Cecil, Jack Cecil and William Stump performed assessments of general health and pest levels in wheat crops in Laramie, Goshen and Platte counties. The evaluations revealed a generally healthy crop suffering setbacks due to drought and high wind conditions. Water restrictions are the largest limiting factor to production and may cause depressed yields this year, they said.

Russian wheat aphids, wheat stem saw fly and Hessian fly were observed in some of the fields, but none should cause significant economic impacts, the specialists said.

Wendy Cecil is a research associate and Stump is a research scientist in the Department of Plant Sciences, and Jack Cecil works for Wyoming Seed Certification – all in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

 

A complete report is available upon request. For more information, contact Stump at 307-766-2062.